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important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by gunjan arora - Friday, 9 October 2009, 06:53 PM
 

1.As the housing affordability gap widens, middle-income families are especially hard-hit, and these families can no longer qualify to buy

homes, and rising rental rates force them to use far more than the standard 25 percent of their incomes for housing, leaving them with no equity or

tax write-offs to offset the expenditures.
(A) and these families can no longer qualify to buy homes, and
(B) since these families can no longer afford to buy homes, furthermore
(C) for these families can no longer afford to buy homes, yet
(D) and these families can no longer afford to buy homes; however,
(E) and these families can no longer afford to buy homes, for

i feel the answer shud noy hv any contrast in it ..ther is no need of contrast in this  sentace ..still the answer is C instead of B...pls expln why

 

2.At Shiprock, New Mexico, a perennially powerful girls’ high school basketball team has become a path to college for some and a

source of pride for a community where the household incomes of 49 percent of them are below the poverty level.
(A) where the household incomes of 49 percent of them are
(B) where they have 49 percent of the household incomes
(C) where 49 percent of the household incomes are
(D) which has 49 percent of the household incomes
(E) in which 49 percent of them have household incomes
  Dagny's one of the posts  say answer is  " C ".....

S seems to b fine as well..and makes sense...
..read smwhere tht D wud mean tht community has incomes...but is it the only reason to eliminate D or  am i missin smthin ...

3. Is it true that -- "In spite of "needs a noun after It--  ??

 

4.Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent and Great Britain, Japan,

and West Germany’s fifteen percent.
(A) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent and Great Britain,

Japan, and West Germany’s fifteen percent.
(B) Fifty-two percent of United States high school graduates go on to college; in Canada it is thirty-five percent and in Great Britain, Japan, and

West Germany it is fifteen percent.
(C) In the United States, Fifty-two percent of high school graduates go on to college, compared with thirty-five percent in Canada and fifteen

percent in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany.
(D) The percentage of high school graduates in the United States who go on to college is fifty-two, compared with Canada’s thirty-five percent,

Great Britain’s fifteen, Japan’s fifteen, and West Germany’s fifteen.
(E) The percentage of United States high school graduates going on to college is fifty-two that in Canada is thirty-five, and that in Great Britain,

Japan, and West Germany is fifteen.
"pls explain the  //ism in this question.."

5. can " neither" or "nor"  be used alone in  a sentance

  i mean is this correct  to say

"Ram doesnt want to go to market Nor do I"

or

"Ram doesnt want to go to market Neitherdo I"

 

6.can u please explain the concept of " ellipses "..its really confusing at  times.

 

i mean which one is correct -

 

"the dolls are priced to sell and they are"

or

"the dolls are priced to sell and they do"

 

7.The proposed health care bill would increase government regulation of health insurance, establish standards that would guarantee wider access to

people with past health problems and to workers changing jobs who otherwise could be uncovered for months.
(A) establish standards that would guarantee wider access to people with past health problems and to workers changing jobs who
(B) establishing standards that would guarantee wider access to people with past health problems and to workers who are changing jobs and
(C) to establish standards that would guarantee wider access to people with past health problems and to workers who change jobs that
(D) for establishing standards that would guarantee wider access for people with past health problems and workers changing jobs who
(E) for the establishment of standards that would guarantee wider access for people with past health problems and workers who are changing jobs that

The answer is " B",,,wudnt it be nice if  we replace "workers who are changing jobs " with "workers who  change jobs "

Thanx a lot

Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by Takahiro Minagawa - Saturday, 10 October 2009, 02:37 PM
 

Hi gunjan arora, here is my explanation for 1.

1.As the housing affordability gap widens, middle-income families are especially hard-hit, and these families can no longer qualify to buy homes, and rising rental rates force them to use far more than the standard 25 percent of their incomes for housing, leaving them with no equity or tax write-offs to offset the expenditures.
(A) and these families can no longer qualify to buy homes, and
(B) since these families can no longer afford to buy homes, furthermore
(C) for these families can no longer afford to buy homes, yet
(D) and these families can no longer afford to buy homes; however,
(E) and these families can no longer afford to buy homes, for



You may be confused between B or C. Thinking of the connection of each sentence, furthermore is inappropriate. It seems OK if put “and” instead of “furthermore”. However, if put “furthermore” here, it will be ambiguous which sentence is preceded by “furthermore”. (Please see below.)



And: Families are hard-hit, for/since they can no longer afford to buy homes and rising rental rates force them…. => very clear



Furthermore: Families are hard-hit, furthermore the rising rental rates force them….

 

or

 

For(=because) they can no longer afford to buy homes, furthermore the rising rent…


=> can be interpreted in two ways

 

 

That’s why furthermore is inappropriate here.

Regarding “yet”, it has two possible usages(meanings):  “but” or “and still/also”.

The meaning of yet here is clearly the latter one.

 

Taka
Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by Takahiro Minagawa - Saturday, 10 October 2009, 02:39 PM
 

Hi again, regarding 2 and 3,

2.At Shiprock, New Mexico, a perennially powerful girls’ high school basketball team has become a path to college for some and asource of pride for a community where the household incomes of 49 percent of them are below the poverty level.
(A) where the household incomes of 49 percent of them are
(B) where they have 49 percent of the household incomes
(C) where 49 percent of the household incomes are
(D) which has 49 percent of the household incomes
(E) in which 49 percent of them have household incomes
  Dagny's one of the posts  say answer is  " C ".....

S seems to b fine as well..and makes sense...
..read smwhere tht D wud mean tht community has incomes...but is it the only reason to eliminate D or  am i missin smthin ...

You are right. It is the reason D is wrong.

3. Is it true that -- "In spite of "needs a noun after It--  ??

Because “In spite of” works as a preposition, “noun” Or “progressive form of a verb” need to be follow.

Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by Takahiro Minagawa - Saturday, 10 October 2009, 02:56 PM
 

Hi again, for 4


(C) In the United States, Fifty-two percent of high school graduates go on to college, compared with thirty-five percent in Canada and fifteen percent in Great Britain, Japan, and West Germany.


The correct answer is (C). It contains 1 comparison and 1 Parallel structure.


I highlighted omitted (common) part in red.


50 % of high school graduates go on to college, compared with 25 % of high school graduates in Canada and 15 % of high school graduates in Great Britain, 15 % of high school graduates in Japan, and 15% of high school graduates in West Germany.

Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by Takahiro Minagawa - Saturday, 10 October 2009, 03:21 PM
  Hi, it's taka again. Here is a explanation for 5

Let me make clear the meaning of usage of “Nor” and “Neither”.

Nor consists of “and” + “not”. Neither consists of “not” + “either”. Thus, “nor “is a conjunction like “and” whereas “Neither” is not a conjunction, meaning that if you need a conjunction, you have to use “nor” instead of “neither”.  In contrast, you cannot use "nor" if no conjunction is needed.

Following examples can be of some help.


ex1) 1 sentence, 1 speaker = “I”
Ram doesn’t want to go to market and I don’t do so.


->  "Ram doesn’t want to go to market nor do I."    is correct.


ex2) 2 sentence, 2 speaker = “someone” and “I”
speaker 1) Ram doesn’t want to go to market.
( as a respond to the sentence above)  I don’t, either.


->  "Ram doesn’t want to go to market neither do I"  is wrong because original sentence has no conjunction. It must be 2 different sentences from 2 speakers.

Thus,

"Ram doesn’t want to go to market”
Neither do I."                                     is correct.


Thanks.

Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by Takahiro Minagawa - Saturday, 10 October 2009, 03:56 PM
 

Hi, we almost done except the remaining 2 questionssmile. It is my last reply.



For 6,

With regard to your question, I guess the latter one is possibly correct. (However, it may change, depending on the rest of the sentence.)


The ultimate rule of ellipses is that you can omit the word that is already shown in the sentence without changing the form.


In this case, for the former one, the omitted word after “they are” would be selling or sold or priced. If you put “priced” here, the meaning would seem to be strange. Thus, the possible words must be “selling” or "sold". However, both of them are not shown in the sentence. (If the other part of the sentences include “selling” or sold, it can be the correct answer.


For the latter one, “do” is used as a substitute of “sell” and you can see the word of “sell” in the sentence. Thus, it is a good candidate as a correct answer.



"the dolls are priced to sell and they are"

or

"the dolls are priced to sell and they do"


For 7,
the meaning would be slightly changed if
you replace "workers who are changing jobs " with "workers who  change jobs "

"workers who are changing" means workers who are frequently and continuously change jobs.

Of course, if you use
"workers who  change jobs ", it is still grammatically correct.

Please do not hesitate to ask questions if you have.

Taka 

Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by gunjan arora - Monday, 12 October 2009, 11:54 AM
 

Hey Taka...thanx ..a lot...first of all ..for sparing time ....and for all the valueable inputs....

please expln how "worker who change jobs" will have a  different meaning...in no. 7..

...also am sorry but i cud not understand the elimination of  furthermore based on preceding clause...even if we consider the second interpretation  of   furthermore ,,,which is the original structure of our sentance ...wudnt it be correct thn...

Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by Takahiro Minagawa - Monday, 12 October 2009, 01:04 PM
  Hi gunjan arora,

I guess my explanations was a bit insufficient.

For "furthermore" vs "yet",

let me explain in a more grammatical way.
In GMAT SC, if there is an ambiguous part, it never be correct, even it is the original structure.

As I mentioned, furthermore is ambiguous here, because it can be interpreted in some ways.
It is because "furthermore" is an adverb, which cannot connect the two sentences.
pls see following example.

A is good, and B is good, furthermore C is good.

This sentence cannot be the correct answer in GMAT because
"furthermore", which means "in addition to" , is ambiguous.
In other words,"furthermore C is good" could have mean
"In addition to that A is good, C is good."
or "In addition to that B is good, C is good."
or "In addition to that A is good and B is good, C is good."

There are three possible patterns how "furthermore" qualify the other part.

On the other hand, yet can be functioned as a conjunction, means
it connect with the part immediately before "yet".

In the similar examples,

A is good, and B is good, yet C is good.
,meaning "B is good, and C is good."

For 7

Verb + ing means "continuous" action or "future" action, depending on the verb.

Please see the below,

1)
He buys many cars.
-> it sounds a bit weird, it may be incorrect and he will buy many cars.
 
He is buying many cars.
-> He is actually buying cars. probably he already bought some and will buy more.

2)
He crossed the street.
-> He completed crossing the street.

He was crossing the street.
-> He is in the middle of street and still continuously crossing.

In a similar way,
3)
He changes jobs, means he is the kind of person who likely to change jobs.

He is changing jobs, means he has already changed jobs and will also change jobs in the future.

Got it?

Taka






Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by gunjan arora - Monday, 12 October 2009, 03:08 PM
  hey ..taka ....got it now.....thnx ..once again ...btw ..are u the new english faculty on TG..if yes ..thn al the gudluck to u////smile ,....and if not,,thn also..gudluck
Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by Takahiro Minagawa - Tuesday, 13 October 2009, 01:32 PM
  Thanx. I'm just a GMAT taker studying to get MBA, like you.

Good luck to you, too.
Re: important grammar doubts...FOR DT?TG,,cudnt find in forums
by himanshu bhutani - Tuesday, 6 July 2010, 06:01 PM
 

Hi Taka,

Please explain why 'C' option is incorrect for Q 7 . I understood the logic behind ' workers who are changing jobs' but is it wrong to use 'to establish'  in this sentence ? Please reply !!

Thanks..