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Tenses
by Dagny Taggart - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 06:40 AM
  cat 2008 cat 2009 mba 2008 tenses english grammarI just checked the date of the last article that I wrote; it was posted on 15th May, 2008. Frankly speaking, it was written some 20 days prior to that date and, after much procrastinating and rationalizing, we decided to post it on 15th Day of May. Now I have no choice but to write another article. Although TG and I don't suffer from writer's block, our eagerness to do something better with our every article causes us much delay. Another reason for delays that I can think of is that we are our own bosses so there is actually no one who can question us about the work being done on time or not. We do things because we like doing them. Some two years back, TG and I used to sit in IIT Delhi campus and talk about our dreams while sipping our coffee. I don't know what stuff dreams are made of but I know that if you dream and work towards them, they do come true. We also dreamt of going to IIMs but that didn't happen. The only thing we knew was that we were standing on a hill in our mountain of dreams, telling ourselves it's not as hard, hard, hard as it seems. Taking that as a bitter medicine we kept moving. Today if you ask us whether we have an iota of regret about not going there, we'd say Nah!! Today, having two companies under our belt and meeting more than forty thousand students in one and a half years doesn't feel so bad at all. Does it?  So dream and work towards your dreams. No matter what happens on the D Day, go face it and don't let the much-hyped exam deter you from making your dreams come true. So, here's presenting you my humble addition that may help you in a little way to face the monster on 16th November 2008.

This tensed topic is about the tensions in Grammar Land. Oh yes! There is a Grammar Land where people like adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, nouns, verbs etc., dwell, and where there are people there is tension. The only whacky thing with these people is that they worry about their present as well. Don’t ask me how because I am the Queen of Gadha Land, and not Grammar Land. So, I don’t know. Well! When I have shared the best of my moments with the Gadha Gang, how could I not share this tension?

But I digress.

On my research I got to know that these tensions are close associates of verbs. They are commonly addressed as Verb Tenses in other lands. From here on, I'll present my research on the topic. All you have to do is fill your coffee mugs, make yourself comfortable in your chairs, and pick up a pen and a paper. And do what? Read on, what else?

I won't go much on the definition about what Past, Present and Future tenses are but this table would help you understand the differences in the usage. We'll be talking more about the application part.
 

cat 2008 tenses

In normal speech, we generally take care of the usage but when it comes to sentence correction, we tend to deviate. The following points would help you overcome this problem:

Use Simple Tenses

Try to use Simple Tenses Simple Present, Simple Past, and Simple Future instead of progressive tenses until and unless the continuous aspect of an action is not defined.

When a passage has more than one verb, the relation between the tenses of the verbs is called the sequence of tenses. Sentences with more than one action do not necessarily require multiple tenses. Unless, the action is not taking place at different times, use the same verb tenses in a given sentence.

I swim, dance, and jog every day. (all present tense)

I swam, danced, and jogged yesterday. (all paste tense)

In the following sentence, the actions are happening at different times. Hence, different verb tenses are used.

James had been working in the same company for almost three years before he found another job. (past perfect and past)

Now let's have a look at a sentence correction question:

Native American burial sites dating back 5 000 years indicate that the residents of Maine at that time were part of a widespread culture of Algonquian-speaking people.

(A) were part of a widespread culture of Algonquian-speaking people
(B) had been part of a widespread culture of people who were Algonquian-speaking
(C) were people who were part of a widespread culture that was Algonquian-speaking
(D) had been people who were part of a widespread culture that was Algonquian-speaking
(E) were a people which had been part of a widespread, Algonquian-speaking culture

The correct option is A. A very simple reason being that it correctly uses simple past throughout. No big deal.

Option B and D are unnecessarily using present perfect tense and in the process deviating from the original meaning of the sentence. Use of perfect tense suggests that the Native Americans had previously ceased to be part of the widespread culture. Wrong!

Option E is has a problem of inconsistent tenses- were….had been.  Option C is wordy. Another error is in the meaning that it implies. People should describe as large groups to which residents belong and not the residents.

Don't use Perfect Tenses Imperfectly

The present perfect tense is used to describe action that began in the past and continues into the present or has just been completed at the moment of utterance. The present perfect is often used to suggest that a past action still has an effect upon something happening in the present.

The Thumb Rule for forming a sentence in Present Perfect is:

cat 2008

They have not submitted the assignments they ought to.

The above sentence maintains that the assignments have not been submitted in the past, and they are still not submitted.

The past perfect tense is used to refer to actions that took place, and were completed in the past. The past perfect is often used to emphasis that one action, event or condition ended before another past action, event, or condition began. The past participle of a verb ends with "ed", e.g. talked, walked, played. Verbs such as go, to be, etc. have different participles. Gone, been are  the participle forms of go, and to be. If more than one action takes place at different times in past, past perfect for an earlier action and simple past for later action should be used.

The Thumb Rule for forming a sentence in Past Perfect is:

cat 2008 english grammar

 
Each of the italicized verbs in the following sentences is in the past perfect.

Nirmesh thought that Rohit had copied the assignment.

The presentation had ended but we stayed for the lunch.
 

The future perfect is used to refer to an action that will be completed sometime in the future before another action takes place.

The Thumb Rule for forming a sentence in Future Perfect is:

cat

The italicized part in the following sentences is in the future perfect tense.

I will have finished reading 5 books before the book fair starts.

Some buildings that were destroyed and heavily damaged in the earthquake last year were constructed in violation of the city's building code.

(A) Some buildings that were destroyed and heavily damaged in the earthquake last year were
(B) Some buildings that were destroyed or heavily damaged in the earthquake last year had been
(C) Some buildings that the earthquake destroyed and heavily damaged last year have been
(D) Last year the earthquake destroyed or heavily damaged some buildings that have been
(E) Last year some of the buildings that were destroyed or heavily damaged in the earthquake had been

If you read the main sentence carefully, the logic says that construction of the buildings was completed prior to the earthquake.  Option A and C illogically state that some buildings were both destroyed and damaged. How is that possible? Also in option A fails to indicate that the buildings were constructed before the earthquake occurred. By using perfect tense in option C and D, the meaning incorrectly comes out that the buildings have been constructed after they were destroyed last year. Option E states that the construction of buildings occurred last year, and not the earthquake. Only option B maintains both the logic by using the correct tenses.

A perfect example to show that improper use of tenses can lead you in creating illogical errors.

Moody Infinitive

Present Infinitive ( to eat): To show same-time action or action later than the verb.

In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell, and they do.

In the above sentence, the price cut is done now and the reduction in inventories will happen later.

Perfect Infinitive (to have eaten):  To show action earlier than the verb.

They consider the Gadha Gang to have been taught very well.

The infinitive "to have been taught" indicates the time prior to the verb "consider".

Have a look at the following example:-
 

A firm that specializes in the analysis of handwriting claims from a one-page writing sample that it can assess more than three hundred personality traits, including enthusiasm, imagination, and ambition.

(A) from a one-page writing sample that it can assess.
(B) from a one-page writing sample it has the ability of assessing
(C) the ability, from a one-page writing sample, of assessing
(D) to be able, from a one-page writing sample, to assess
(E) being able to assess, from a one-page writing sample,

In the above sentence :-

1)      Logically the connection has to develop between claims and firm's assertion.
2)     
To assess is idiomatic.

In option A with the placement of that after "sample", it produces an unintended statement that the claims were made on the basis of one page writing sample.
Option B- "the ability of assessing" is unidiomatic.
Option C- the ability.. of assessing is unidiomatic.
Option D- correctly follows both logical and idiomatic path.
Option E- "claims being able to assess" is ungrammatical.
 

Past Participles of Irregular Verbs

Remember the simple past and past participle of the irregular verbs.
 

cat tenses

 

Dr. Hakuta's research among Hispanic children in the United States indicates that the more the children use both Spanish and English, their intellectual advantage is greater in skills underlying reading ability and nonverbal logic.

(A) their intellectual advantage is greater in skills underlying reading ability and nonverbal logic
(B) their intellectual advantage is the greater in skills underlaying reading ability and nonverbal logic
(C) the greater their intellectual advantage in skills underlying reading ability and nonverbal logic
(D) in skills that underlay reading ability and nonverbal logic, their intellectual advantage is the greater
(E) in skills underlying reading ability and nonverbal logic, the greater intellectual advantage is theirs

The three things noteworthy about the above sentence are:

1)  The sentence is the present form.
2)  A present participle of "underlay" should be used as a modifier of "skills". The present participle is underlying.
3)  The phrase "the more the X...the greater the Y" should be completed.

We go by options again.

Option B and D are ruled out because of second point stated above.
Option A rules out because of point number 3.
Option E is an awkward construction.
Only Option C clearly fits into all the points stated for the sentence to be both logically and grammatically correct.

If-then can be an inTense Construction- Be Cautious!

Sentences that use the word "if" to describe hypothetical conditions require a conditional verb construction. These sentences have two parts: if clause, and the then clause. The word "if" does not always signal a conditional sentence. Only when the sentence has a "then" clause, then the sentence is considered a conditional sentence. Also note would/could never appears in the "if" clause.

cat

If v/s Whether
 

Use If- When you have a conditional sentence.
Use whether When you have two alternatives possible.
Do not use "whether or not" construction while solving sentence correction questions.

Go through the following examples:-
 

I do not know if I will go for shopping today or tomorrow.
I do not know whether I will go for shopping today or tomorrow.

In both the sentences above there is one surety that I am confused about going for shopping.

Let's see the difference in meaning of both the sentences.

With the usage of if, the additional condition is that I may not go of shopping at all. It in whether this condition is not applicable. I will go shopping either today or tomorrow. GMAT considers "whether" as a correct usage.

The first decision for most tenants living in a building undergoing being converted to cooperative ownership is if to sign a no-buy pledge with the other tenants.

(A) being converted to cooperative ownership is if to sign
(B) being converted to cooperative ownership is whether they should be signing
(C) being converted to cooperative ownership is whether or not they sign
(D) conversion to cooperative ownership is if to sign
(E) conversion to cooperative ownership is whether to sign

If I would have solved the questions I would have gone in the following way-

Being is generally not accepted in GMAT Land so, I eliminate option A, B and C right away. In option D if is used, not a very safe option. E uses whether, and correctly uses conversion, which grammatically uses the phrase begun by undergoing. Hence, E is the best choice.

But let me elaborate more on this.

In options A, B an C, the phrase being converted is redundant because the process indicated by being has already being conveyed by the usage of undergoing. D brings the possibility of not signing at all by the usage of if and the same goes for option A as well. Hence, eliminated. Option E uses "whether", and is grammatically and logically correct.
 

A trip to fantasy Grammar Land is over. Come back to reality. This is Gadha Land, and we are donkeys. Remember? smile

 

 

I shall have to end here and leave the rest of it for my CBT Club students. I shall cover some problems based on this in the CBT Club this week.

 

If you think this article was useful, help others by sharing it with your friends!


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Re: Tenses
by Rishi Kapoor - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 09:36 AM
 

Thanks for the article, mam.

...RK...

Re: Tenses
by priyanka tiwari - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 10:52 AM
 

hi dt mam

the article is very useful

however i had a doubt whether "he has gone to the market" is past participle or present participle (sentences in 2nd table 2nd column)

thanks

priyanka

Re: Tenses
by Chinmay Korhalkar - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 11:45 AM
  Thank you mam for such a wonderful article. smile

Since this is a grammar article I feel it's the right place to ask a query I had today morning regarding infinitives. It's from Wren and Martin.

It says : The infinitive without 'to' is used after-had better,had rather,would rather,sooner than,rather than.(Point no 256 in Wren n Martin)

a) You had better ask permission.
b) I had rather play than work.

here,ask & play have been used as infinitives.

but is the sentence - You had better asked (for) permission
is grammatically wrong? Is the 'for' required in this sentence if I want to use 'asked' instead of 'ask'?

Thanks in advance.
Chinmay.
Tenses Exercise
by Dagny Taggart - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 12:33 PM
 

1.          Thomas Eakins’ powerful style and his choices of subject—the advances in modern surgery, the discipline of sport, the strains of individuals in tension with society or even with themselves—was as disturbing to his own time as it is compelling for ours.

(A) was as disturbing to his own time as it is

(B) were as disturbing to his own time as they are

(C) has been as disturbing in his own time as they are

(D) had been as disturbing in his own time as it was

(E) have been as disturbing in his own time as

 

2.          The company announced that its profits declined much less in the second quarter than analysts had expected it to and its business will improve in the second half of the year.

(A) had expected it to and its business will improve

(B) had expected and that its business would improve

(C) expected it would and that it will improve its business

(D) expected them to and its business would improve

(E) expected and that it will have improved its business

 

3.          The Coast guard is conducting tests to see whether pigeons can be trained to help find survivors of wrecks at sea.

(A) to see whether pigeons can be trained to help find

(B) to see whether pigeons can be trained as help to find

(C) to see if pigeons can be trained for helping to find

(D) that see if pigeons are able to be trained in helping to find

(E) that see whether pigeons are able to be trained for help in finding

 

4.          Parliament did not accord full refugee benefits to twelve of the recent immigrants because it believed that to do it rewards them for entering the country illegally.

(A) to do it rewards

(B) doing it rewards

(C) to do this would reward

(D) doing so would reward

(E) to do it would reward

 

5.          After the Civil War, contemporaries of Harriet Tubman’s maintained that she has all of the qualities of a great leader, coolness in the face of danger, an excellent sense of strategy, and an ability to plan in minute detail.

(A) Tubman’s maintained that she has

(B) Tubman’s maintain that she had

(C) Tubman’s have maintained that she had

(D) Tubman maintained that she had

(E) Tubman had maintained that she has

 

6.          It is possible that Native Americans originally have migrated to the Western Hemisphere over a bridge of land that once existed between Siberia and Alaska.

(A) have migrated to the Western Hemisphere over a bridge of land that once existed

(B) were migrating to the Western Hemisphere over a bridge of land that existed once

(C) migrated over a bridge of land to the Western Hemisphere that once existed

(D) migrated to the Western Hemisphere over a bridge of land that once existed

(E) were migrating to the Western Hemisphere over a bridge of land existing once

 

7.          As measured by the Commerce Department, corporate profits peaked in the fourth quarter of 1988 and have slipped since then, as many companies have been unable to pass on higher costs.

(A) and have slipped since then, as many companies have been unable to pass on higher costs

(B) and have slipped since then, the reason being because many companies have been unable to pass on higher costs

(C) and slipped since then, many companies being unable to pass on higher costs

(D) but, many companies unable to pass on higher costs, they have slipped since then

(E) yet are slipping since then, because many companies were unable to pass on higher costs

 

8.          A wildlife expert predicts that the reintroduction of the caribou into northern Minnesota would fail if the density of the timber wolf population in that region is more numerous than one wolf for every 39 square miles.

(A) would fail if the density of the timber wolf population in that region is more numerous than

(B) would fail provided the density of the timber wolf population in that region is more than

(C) should fail if the timber wolf density in that region was greater than

(D) will fail if the density of the timber wolf population in that region is greater than

(E) will fail if the timber wolf density in that region were more numerous than

 

9.          Most state constitutions now mandate that the state budget be balanced each year.

(A) mandate that the state budget be balanced

(B) mandate the state budget to be balanced

(C) mandate that the state budget will be balanced

(D) have a mandate for a balanced state budget

(E) have a mandate to balance the state budget

10.      In an effort to reduce their inventories, Italian vintners have cut prices; their wines have been priced to sell, and they are.

(A) have been priced to sell, and they are

(B) are priced to sell, and they have

(C) are priced to sell, and they do

(D) are being priced to sell, and have

(E) had been priced to sell, and they have

 

 

Re: Tenses
by Ask Jeeves - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 01:14 PM
 

Maam, among the following sentences,

1. If you study hard, you will pass in exam

2. If you studied hard, you would pass the exam

3. If you had studied hard, you would have passed the exam

Can the sentences 2 and 3 be used interchangeably? If no, please give the situations where they should be used aptly.

Thanks in advance,

Praveen.

Re: Tenses
by vamsi krishna - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 01:38 PM
  Mam,

Gr8 work

regarding Conditionals
it seemz u missedout the zero conditional of the following form..


If you study hard, you pass the exam.
Re: Tenses
by Dagny Taggart - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 01:45 PM
  Hi Priyanka,

The usage is correct. The past participle form of 'go' is 'gone'.

Past- I watched the movie.
Past Participle- I have watched the movie.

Dagny
Re: Tenses
by Dipanjan Biswas - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 01:47 PM
  Again a good article in GADHA LAND.
Thank you mam for your constant efforts.

TG Rockzzz
Re: Tenses
by Dagny Taggart - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 01:52 PM
  Vamsi,

I din't think of adding zero conditional but now that you have mentioned, I'll write a small post and add it here. Thank you.smile

Dagny

Re: Tenses
by Dagny Taggart - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 03:53 PM
  Hi Chinmay,

Though 'had is a past form but in expression 'had better', the meaning is in present or future.

You had better ask permission is the correct usage.

The negative form is 'had better not'

I had better not come.
Re: Tenses
by Ask Jeeves - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 04:01 PM
 



1. b
2. b
3. a
4. d
5. d
6. d
7. a
8. d
9. b
10.c

thanks,

Pravs.

Re: Tenses Exercise
by Jahnavi Kundu - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 04:12 PM
 

Hello Ma'am

It was a pleasant surprise to log onto TG and find not just today's RC but also an eagerly awaited article smile Ever since you mentioned it in a thread last week, I'm sure most of us have been looking forward to it...

My answers for the exercise are:

  1. B
  2. B
  3. A
  4. D
  5. D
  6. D
  7. A
  8. D
  9. A
  10. C

Regards,

Jahnavi

Re: Tenses
by Dagny Taggart - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 04:31 PM
  Hi Praveen,

If you study hard, you will pass the exam- There is a possibility that you will pass the exam if you study hard.

If you studied hard, you would pass the exam.- Here you are imagining the situation but you do not expect the person to study hard. The meaning is not past.

If you had studied hard, you would have passed the exam- - Here the real situation is that the person has not studied hard. You are basically talking about the past.

@ J Lo, You are welcome.smile

Re: Tenses
by Ask Jeeves - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 04:54 PM
 

Lucid and understandable explanation!!!

Thank u so much maam,

Pravs. smile

Re: Tenses
by vamsi krishna - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 05:06 PM
  Mam,
THanks for consideration..

I would like 2 bring out the usage of these four conditionals eventhough itz a digression from tenses..

The zero conditional is used when the result of the condition is always true (like a scientific fact) or habitual (ie., used to express certainity)
---> If you heat ice, it melts. (fact)
---> My parents get angry if I come home late. (automatic)

The first conditional is used when there is a real possibility that the condition will happen in present /future.
--->If it rains now/tomorrow ,what will you wear?
(Raining tomorrow is a real possibility)

The second conditional is used to express an unreal possibility/wish in Imaginary Present /unreal future
--> If I had the time now/tomorrow,I would post new topic here.
( There r slim chances for me 2 be free)

The third conditional is used to talk about things which DID NOT HAPPEN in the past. It is often used to express criticism or regret
--> If I had followed DT's advice last year, I would have cracked CAT by now.

In first,second, third conditionals some of the verbs in both the clauses may be changed to continuous / perfect / perfect continuous forms also
As in
Simple present/past/future to present/past/future Continuous
Simple present/past/future to present/past/future perfect
Simple present to present perfect

I conditional : If she has written the letter, I'll be posting it.
If you are looking for Sunil, you'll find him upstairs.

II conditional : If I were on holiday, I might be touring Italy too.

III conditional : If she had accepted the offer, she would be joining us tomorrow.


In addition there r Wat r called Mixed Conditionals..
Ex. If I weren't going out tomorrow, I would have Studied Conditionals. (OUT OF SYLLABUS)


Pl. Correct me if I am wrong.

Folks! Try the following exercise.....awesome
http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/allcnd1.htm

regards,
VaMsI

Re: Tenses
by Dagny Taggart - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 05:16 PM
  Thank you for the helping hand Vamsi. Very neat explanation. Please do not add external links in your post; if at all you want to, add as text links. smile

Dagny
Re: Tenses Exercise
by vamsi krishna - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 05:44 PM
 
My answers
1. B
2 B
3 A
4 D
5 D
6 D
7 A
8 D
9 A
10 A

regards

VaMsi
Re: Tenses Exercise
by avijit mohapatra - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 09:00 PM
  Thanx mam for this really helpful article
My answers:-
1 b
2 b
3 a
4 d
5 d
6 d
7 a
8 d
9 b
10 c
Re: Tenses
by Md Shajji Razzaq - Thursday, 7 August 2008, 09:13 PM
 

Hi Dagny,

amazing article! Thankyou so much.

Thanks,

Shajji

Re: Tenses Exercise
by Tuhin Banerjee - Friday, 8 August 2008, 05:42 PM
 

1. B

2. B

3. B

4. D

5. D

6. D

7. A

8. D

9. C

10. A

Re: Tenses
by Akshay Malhotra - Saturday, 9 August 2008, 08:51 PM
  Hi!

A very good article indeed. The problem with grammar is that the Rules slip by with time.

I have a doubt in the Last example, the options given are

(D) conversion to cooperative ownership is if to sign
(E) conversion to cooperative ownership is whether to sign

If we use (If) this implies that there is a possibility that the tenants do not sign the 
no-buy pledge.
The above sounds more logical
to me.

But on using weather this means its just a confusion and any how they have to sign the
no-buy pledge. Then what is the decision  here to be made?

Please correct me if I am wrong.



Thanks,
Akshay
Re: Tenses Exercise
by Serial Sinner - Monday, 11 August 2008, 02:31 PM
  Hi,
My answers:
1. B
2. B
3. A
4. D
5. D
6. D
7. A
8. D
9. A
10. C
Re: Tenses Exercise
by CATendra 2008 - Monday, 11 August 2008, 03:37 PM
  B
B
C
D
E
D
A
D
D
E
Re: Tenses
by akanksha panwar - Monday, 11 August 2008, 04:23 PM
  A very useful article...must say...plz keep posting such helpful articles !!!

U're gr8.
Re: Tenses Exercise
by Anamica Sinha - Tuesday, 12 August 2008, 03:13 PM
 

Hello.....

My answers are:

1- B

2- B

3- C

4- D

5- D

6- D

7- A

8- D

9- A

10- C

I would like to know whether the ans given by me are correct or not... !!! If its wrong, pls explain it...

Waiting for a reply..

thanks !!!

Re: Tenses Exercise
by love kumar - Wednesday, 13 August 2008, 10:27 AM
 

Hi Dangy ..how r u doing?

my  responses are

D, B, B, D,E,C,A,D,D,C...

r dey right??

hay if i want to write a mail to u..where can i write??

tk cr

 

Re: Tenses Exercise
by Mohit Khatri - Wednesday, 13 August 2008, 02:43 PM
  My answers: - 1.E 2.B 3.C 4.D 5.D 6.D 7.A 8.D 9.B 10.C
Re: Tenses
by Richa Sinha - Friday, 15 August 2008, 04:07 PM
  Thanks DT for the great article.
My answer for the questions are:
1c
2d
3a
4d
5e
6d
7c
8d
9e
10e
Re: Tenses
by Soumya De - Saturday, 16 August 2008, 01:07 PM
 

My answers:

  1. B
  2. A
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. D
  7. A
  8. D
  9. B
  10. C

Most of the previous post indicate B as the answer for 2...could someone clarify why?

Dagny ma'am it would be great if you could provide the actual key smile

As always a great overall article

Re: Tenses
by Alan Kumar - Saturday, 16 August 2008, 08:05 PM
 

Hi Mam,

As per ur article

  • for Present Perfect Progressive its :He/she have been eating.
  • for Future Perfect Progressive its : He/she have been eating.

I have a doubt in it  whether it takes same form for both Present/Future Perfect Progressive. I think

  • for Present Perfect Progressive it should be :He/she have been eating.
  • for Future Perfect Progressive it should be : He/she will have been eating.

Kindly, Clarify the same.... Thanx In advance ...smile

Regards,

Alan

Re: Tenses
by Dagny Taggart - Sunday, 17 August 2008, 07:22 AM
  Corrected.
Re: Tenses Exercise
by Dagny Taggart - Sunday, 17 August 2008, 08:47 AM
  Hi All,

Answers:-

  1. B
  2. B
  3. A
  4. D
  5. D
  6. D
  7. A
  8. D
  9. A
  10. C
Dagny
Re: Tenses
by Alan Kumar - Sunday, 17 August 2008, 08:24 PM
 

Thanx.... Dagny

Article is too good ....smile... waiting for some more article on grammer in TG.

My answers are:-  

1. B

2. A

3.B

4. D

5. D

6. D

7. A

8. D

9. B

10. C

Regards,

Alan

Re: Tenses
by ankur rustagi - Saturday, 13 September 2008, 03:46 AM
  Thanks for the article mam, its been very helpful.
Re: Tenses
by harpreet singh - Sunday, 14 September 2008, 06:09 PM
 

Hi

First of all i wud like to thank u for this article. I hv sm doubts in Past Participles of Irregular Verbs : Correct me if i m wrong

In the example of lay, u hv used lain as past particle of lay but i think it should be laid. There is a lot of confusion among the usage of lie and lay and their past particles. I am trying to discuss this a bit and hope it wud be useful for all

Verb           Infinitive           Past Tense           Past Participle
lie               lie                   lay                    lain
lay              lay                  laid                   laid 
 
The reason these verbs present a problem for anyone is that the past tense of the verb "lie" is identical in appearance to the present tense of the verb "lay."
 
 
Re: Tenses
by divya chaudhary - Saturday, 18 April 2009, 11:33 AM
  hi mam..

mam can u plz explain answers for 1,2 and 4th questions..

n please do tell..when to use will and when would??
Re: Tenses Exercise
by priyanka rao - Saturday, 9 May 2009, 11:29 PM
 

1-a

2-c

3-a

4-d

5-

6-d

7-a

8-d

9-e

10-a

Re: Tenses Exercise
by Nitin Srivastava - Sunday, 1 November 2009, 01:50 PM
 

I am not getting why C cant be the answer for 3 ... can someone help ?

Re: Tenses Exercise
by amit amit - Sunday, 8 November 2009, 07:26 PM
 
kindly explain the answers of 7th, 10th questions.
Re: Tenses
by Partha Sarthi Burman - Sunday, 13 June 2010, 05:37 PM
  Hello dagny,

I read the article, its too good. I have some doubt, need your help.

1) In the first table of this article, table - Present tense, column-
present perfect progressive. First sentence goes this way..." He/She have been eating".. I have a doubt whether it should be "have" or "has". As he/she is a third person, singular pronoun hence the verb should be "has".

2) Under the heading " Use simple present", you have mentioned an example "James had been working in the same company for almost three years before he found another job". I think the first tense is Past perfect progressive as it follows Had + been + present participle.

I may be wrong at my end but please clarify these doubts

Thanks..

Parth
Re: Tenses
by abhishek Gupta - Tuesday, 31 August 2010, 11:46 AM
 

Hi Parth,

I think you are right in your observations.

BTW i started preparing for GMAT this week and i have some doubts.

The OG mentions the following for a correct usage of tense:

"He has gone to school since he was five years old". I feel this is wrong and should be

"He has been going to school since he was five years old".

 

Please clarify

Re: Tenses
by Vivek Srivastava - Tuesday, 10 May 2011, 01:27 AM
  Quite a useful article mam,

1 correction : "If I would have solved the questions I would have gone in the following way-...."
 
should be-
If I had solved the questions I would have gone in the following way...

PS: thanx tonssmile
Re: Tenses
by ashish mishra - Sunday, 31 July 2011, 05:57 PM
  DT mam,
very informative article.
i think there is a mistake in present perfect progressive tense example given in the table,it must be "he/she has been eating."
please clarify .