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Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Total Gadha - Saturday, 28 April 2007, 02:26 AM
  cat mba jumbled paragraphs parajumblesEvery MBA aspirant starting his preparation for CAT 2009 will stumble into parajumbles, or jumbled paragraphs as they're formally known, sooner or later. The instructions will read "Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph". Given below would be 4 or 5 perplexing sentences which he would need to sort and arrange like a jigsaw puzzle. Sounds fun? It is. If one knows how to go about it, that is. Solving jumbled paragraphs is a science. It is so much of a science that you can obtain an accuracy of 100% even if you are not a good reader. I have always maintained an accuracy of more than 90% in parajumbles. Yesterday, while thinking about writing this article, I attempted jumbled paragraphs of CAT 2001 (to check if I was still in shape) and got 5 out 5 correct. Although in later years the level of difficulty has become a notch higher, the technique for solving parajumbles remains the same. And it always pays to start small with simple questions. In this article, I will cover all the basic techniques there are to solve jumbled paragraphs.

For me, cracking the parajumbles revolves around one basic technique:

                                                      cat mba jumbled paragraph parajumbles

Suppose you establish the link 'BA'. The given options are (a) DABC          (b) ACDB          (c) CBAD           (d) DBAC. Now you are left with option (c) and (d) to examine. You read the sentences in the order given by these two options and use your methods again to determine which one is correct.

Is establishing links between two sentences easy?

Not Always. However, easy or not, you can certainly establish links between two or more sentences with the help of some friends found in the sentences. These friends are:

TRANSITION WORDS:

Transition words make the shift from one idea to another very smooth. They organize and connect the sentences logically. Observing the transition words found in a sentence can often give you a clue about the sentence that will come before/after that particular sentence. Given below are some commonly used transition words:

also, again, as well as, besides, furthermore, in addition, likewise, moreover, similarly, consequently, hence, otherwise, subsequently, therefore, thus, as a rule, generally, for instance, for example, for one thing, above all, aside from, barring, besides, in other words, in short, instead, likewise, on one hand, on the other hand, rather, similarly, yet, but, however, still, nevertheless, first of all, to begin with, at the same time, for now, for the time being, in time, later on, meanwhile, next, then, soon, the meantime, later, while, earlier, simultaneously, afterward, in conclusion, with this in mind, after all, all in all, to sum up.

So how does knowledge of transition words helps us in parajumbles? Try out this CAT question:

(CAT 2001)
A.   But in the industrial era destroying the enemy's productive capacity means bombing the factories which are located in the cities.
B.   So in the agrarian era, if you need to destroy the enemy's productive capacity, what you want to do is bum his fields, or if you're really vicious, salt them.
C.   Now in the information era, destroying the enemy's productive capacity means destroying the information infrastructure.
D.   How do you do battle with your enemy?
E.   The idea is to destroy the enemy's productive capacity, and depending upon the economic foundation, that productive capacity is different in each case.

F.    With regard to defence, the purpose of the military is to defend the nation and be prepared to do battle with its enemy.

1.         FDEBAC                        2.         FCABED                        3.         DEBACF                        4.         DFEBAC

Answer: Look at the transition word "but" in the first sentence. It signifies that the sentence is expressing an idea contrary to an idea expressed in some previous sentence. Now we need to find that previous sentence. If we further look at the beginning of the first sentence, it says "but in the industrial era..." which suggests that the contrariness is with respect to eras. Looking further, we see that sentence B and C are also starting with statement about eras. But the transition word at the start of C is "now" which expresses present era and hence it cannot chronologically come before any other past era. That is, if information era is the present era, talk about any other era will come before this. So sentence B is the correct sentence to come before the first sentence. Likewise, sentence C is the correct sentence to come after the first sentence (sentence C is continuing the idea). Therefore, we have the link BAC.

We see that option 1, 3 and 4 all have the link BAC. Furthermore, all the three options have the link EBAC. Therefore, we only need to arrange D and F. The sentence F states that "The purpose is...to battle with the enemy" and D questions "how do you battle with the enemy?" Therefore, D will come after F.

Hence FDEBAC is the correct arrangement.

PERSONAL PRONOUNS:

Personal pronouns are he, she, it, him, her, they, you, your etc. Remember that personal pronouns always refer to a person, place or thing etc. Therefore, if a sentence contains a personal pronoun without mentioning the person, place or object it is referring to, the person, place or object must have come in the previous sentence. Often, this is a good lead to identify a link. Solve this CAT question:

(CAT 2001)
A.   Although there are large regional variations, it is not infrequent to find a large number of people sitting here and there and doing nothing.
B.   Once in office, they receive friends and relatives who feel free to call any time without prior appointment.
C.   While working, one is struck by the slow and clumsy actions and reactions, indifferent attitudes, procedure rather than outcome orientation, and the lack of consideration for others.
D.   Even those who are employed often come late to the office and leave early unless they are forced to be punctual.
E.   Work is not intrinsically valued in
India.
F.    Quite often people visit ailing friends and relatives or go out of their way to help them in their personal matters even during office hours.

1.             ECADBF                  2.             EADCFB                  3.             EADBFC                  4.             ABFCBE

Answer: Look at the personal pronoun "they" in sentence B: Once in office, they receive friends and relatives who feel free to call any time without prior appointment. This they must be referring to some people. The reference to some people only comes in sentences A, D, and F. Therefore, one of the sentences will come before sentence B. Let's see the link AB, DB, and FB;

Link AB- Although there are large regional variations, it is not infrequent to find a large number of people sitting here and there and doing nothing. Once in office, they receive friends and relatives who feel free to call any time without prior appointment.

Link DB- Even those who are employed often come late to the office and leave early unless they are forced to be punctual. Once in office, they receive friends and relatives who feel free to call any time without prior appointment.

Link FB- Quite often people visit ailing friends and relatives or go out of their way to help them in their personal matters even during office hours. Once in office, they receive friends and relatives who feel free to call any time without prior appointment.

Which of these links makes sense? Only link DB seems coherent. Now, we examine the options with link DB. We see that options 1 and 3 have link DB in them. Also, both the options have link ADBF. Therefore, ADBF is a link. Now we only need to place sentences E and C. We can do that by reading the sentences in the order given in options 1 and 3.

Option 1: Link ECADBF- Work is not intrinsically valued in India. While working, one is struck by the slow and clumsy actions and reactions, indifferent attitudes, procedure rather than outcome orientation, and the lack of consideration for others. Although there are large regional variations, it is not infrequent to find a large number of people sitting here and there and doing nothing. Even those who are employed often come late to the office and leave early unless they are forced to be punctual. Once in office, they receive friends and relatives who feel free to call any time without prior appointment. Quite often people visit ailing friends and relatives or go out of their way to help them in their personal matters even during office hours.

Option 3: Link EADBFC- Work is not intrinsically valued in India. Although there are large regional variations, it is not infrequent to find a large number of people sitting here and there and doing nothing. Even those who are employed often come late to the office and leave early unless they are forced to be punctual. Once in office, they receive friends and relatives who feel free to call any time without prior appointment. Quite often people visit ailing friends and relatives or go out of their way to help them in their personal matters even during office hours. While working, one is struck by the slow and clumsy actions and reactions, indifferent attitudes, procedure rather than outcome orientation, and the lack of consideration for others.

Both the options seem plausible. We have to determine which one of the links EC and EA is better. Here is the thumb rule when trying to determine plausibility of a link

                                                                   cat mba jumbled paragraphs parajumbles

In link EC, sentence E is talking about work not being valued whereas sentence C is talking about people being clumsy, indifferent, inconsiderate etc. Sentence C is NOT talking about value of work. It is talking about people's behaviour. Therefore, EC cannot be a logical flow.

In link EA, sentence E is talking about work not being valued and sentence A is talking about people sitting idle. This certainly says that people do not value work. Therefore, EA is the correct link.  Hence, option 3 is correct.

Here is another CAT question that seems tough but can be solved in a matter of seconds. See if you can do it:

(CAT 2001)
A.   Passivity is not, of course, universal.
B.   In areas where there are no lords or laws, or in frontier zones where all men go armed, the attitude of the peasantry may well be different.
C.   So indeed it may be on the fringe of the un-submissive.
D.   However, for most of the soil-bound peasants the problem is not whether to be normally passive or active, but when to pass from one state to another.
E.   This depends on an assessment of the political situation.

1.             BEDAC                    2.             CDABE                    3.             EDBAC                    4.             ABCDE

Answer: It cannot get easier than this. Look at the personal pronoun "it" in sentence C: So indeed it may be on the fringe of the un-submissive. What is "it" here referring to? And it says that "it may be... un-submissive." What can be un-submissive? It cannot be "political situation" (sentence E), "passivity" (sentence A), or "problem" (sentence D). Only "attitude" (sentence B) can be un-submissive. Therefore, BC is a link. The link BC is only present in option 4 and we need not look any further.

DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUNS:

The demonstrative pronouns are "this," "that," "these," and "those." "This" and "that" are used to refer to singular nouns or noun phrases and "these" and "those" are used to refer to plural nouns and noun phrases. Whenever a sentence contains a demonstrative pronoun without mentioning the noun or the noun phrase, it means that the previous sentence must be mentioning that noun or noun phrase. Finding that noun or noun phrase helps us connect two sentences. Here’s another CAT question for you to crack:

(CAT 2001)
A.   Michael Hofman, a poet and translator, accepts this sorry fact without approval or complaint.
B.    But thanklessness and impossibility do not daunt him.
C.   He acknowledges too "in fact he returns to the point often " that best translators of poetry always fail at some level.
D.   Hofman feels passionately about his work, and this is clear from his writings.
E.    In terms of the gap between worth and rewards, translators come somewhere near nurses and street-cleaners.

1.         EACDB              2.         ADEBC              3.         EACBD              4.         DCEAB

Answer: Again an easy one. Notice the demonstrative pronoun "this" in sentence A: Michael Hofman, a poet and translator, accepts this sorry fact without approval or complaint. Also note that sentence A is introducing Michael Hofman (Michael Hofman, a poet and translator,...) and will thereby come before every sentence containing the personal pronoun he or him. So which sorry fact is sentence A referring to? It can only be the fact found in sentence E. Also, other sentences contain "he" or "him". Therefore, EA is a link. Link EA is contained in option 1, 3 and 4. But in 4, sentence D is coming before sentence A, and this cannot happen because sentence A should be before any other sentence referring to Hofman as sentence A is introducing Hofman. Therefore, we are left with options 1 and 3. The difference between options 1 and 3 is the order of sentence D and B. Let's examine the link DB:

Option 1: Link DB- Hofman feels passionately about his work, and this is clear from his writings. But thanklessness and impossibility do not daunt him.

Does this sound like a plausible flow? Certainly NOT. Therefore, link DB is incorrect and the correct answer is option 3.

COMBINING IT ALL WITH LOGIC:

Sometimes using logic to decide the order of sentences can yield high dividends. In the previous example, we had used logic to determine that sentence A would come before any other sentence referring Hofman. Keep your eyes open for clues such as these. Here's is the last CAT question that I cracked, using logic; see if you can do the same:

(CAT 2001)
A.   The situations in which violence occurs and the nature of that violence tends to be clearly defined at least in theory, as in the proverbial Irishman's question: "Is this a private fight or can anyone join in?"
B.    So the actual risk to outsiders, though no doubt higher than our societies, is calculable.
C.   Probably the only uncontrolled applications of force are those of social superiors to social inferiors and even here there are probably some rules.
D.   However binding the obligation to kill, members of feuding families engaged in mutual massacre will be genuinely appalled if by some mischance a bystander or outsider is killed.

1.         DABC                            2.         ACDB                3.         CBAD                            4.         DBAC

Answer: The clue to this question came to me from the word ‘calculable’ in sentence B: So the actual risk to outsiders, though no doubt higher than our societies, is calculable. How does something become "calculable"? Then I noticed sentence A and the phrase "clearly defined in theory..."  Something becomes calculable when it is clearly defined in theory. No other sentence could give answers to "calculable". Therefore, the link AB was clearly marked. The link AB was present in option 1 only. Easy, no?

Notice that I have been going to the option again and again to eliminate one or two options. Form this habit sedulously. It will pay you rich dividends.

And do you know the best part about this article? It is written by me, a Mathematics teacher. big grin

I am afraid I shall have to end here and leave the rest of it for my CBT Club students. I shall cover some problems based on this in the CBT Club this week.

 

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hello TG
by sudama baraily - Saturday, 28 April 2007, 05:13 PM
 

that was a very interesting post.thanks for it.can u plz post articles on  topic   (fact,inference and judgement).its a very confusing topic

 

Re: hello TG
by Total Gadha - Saturday, 28 April 2007, 05:37 PM
  Hi Sudama,

I will try smile

Total Gadha
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by anil bhargava - Saturday, 28 April 2007, 08:35 PM
  gud one..thnx TG smile
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Deep Thinker Gadha - Wednesday, 2 May 2007, 04:47 PM
  approvesmilebig grin
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Tanveer Ahmed - Thursday, 3 May 2007, 01:38 AM
 

Excellent Article!!

Please keep up the goood work!!

Regards

Tanveer

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Total Gadha - Thursday, 3 May 2007, 01:59 AM
  big grinsmilesmileapprove
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Total Gadha - Thursday, 3 May 2007, 02:00 AM
  Thanks Tanveer. smile
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by suchi sarpal - Thursday, 3 May 2007, 02:19 PM
  hmmm i can say tht u have done a gr8 job !!but TG why dont u gv ur 1000s of  para jumbles too ,there in ur downloading section so tht we cld practice of these para jumbles daily frm there ?
Re: hello TG
by ganesh b - Friday, 4 May 2007, 09:19 AM
 

Its thought provoking thoughtful

plz post lessons on  fact,inference,judgements

it will be gr8ful if u do so

 

 

 

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Kumar Mishra - Friday, 4 May 2007, 12:24 PM
 

Hi TG,

Its really cool..

Thanks a Lot

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Total Gadha - Friday, 4 May 2007, 02:38 PM
  Hi Suchi,

Let me post CAT parajumbles for you soon. It will be of great help to you. smile

Total Gadha
Re: hello TG
by Total Gadha - Friday, 4 May 2007, 02:40 PM
  Hi Ganesh,

Will do. smile

Total Gadha
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Ankit Agarwal - Friday, 4 May 2007, 03:49 PM
  Its a great article dude. Keep posting such articles bro. Thanks
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Tanveer Ahmed - Saturday, 5 May 2007, 01:34 PM
 

Hi TG,

I am sure that you must be aware of the MBA prep site Pagalguy.com I am a dedicated Pagal and we are almost fanatically proud of PG but and after a long time I have  found  a site that I think could give PG tough competiton in terms of content. There are some fantastic write-ups on TG! On a related  note..Could you please provide us with write-ups on IFJ kind of questions that came in CAT 2006. I want to stress on that since I feel that Critical Reasoning will play a big role in the VA of the next few CATS..

Regards

Tanveer

 

P.S. Little bit about myself. Took the whole gamut of MBA exams this year. Got into NM but passed upon it as I want to start an Education Centre of my own after passing out of an IIM. So thats the plan as of now. smile Lets see if I am able to achieve it.

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Total Gadha - Sunday, 6 May 2007, 01:31 AM
  Hi Tanveer,

Yes I know about pagalguy and it is an honour to meet a dedicated pagal smile Compared with pagalguy, TG is only six months old so it has a long way to go. About that critical reasoning questions, I AM going through some logic related material to prepare a write-up on IFJ kind of questions. I hope I can come up with that this week. (I am a very lazy person though) smile

Good luck with your CAT this time. Do let me know if you need any help.

Total Gadha
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Tanveer Ahmed - Sunday, 6 May 2007, 04:03 PM
 

Well.. There seems to be a great deal of material on the site even though its just 6 months old.. so congratulations on that.

Will definitely contact you with my Quant doubts soon..

am currently reading the book God created the Integers..by Stephen Hawking.... good book...sort of serves as a VA and QA combined help..wink

Regards

Tanveer

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Total Gadha - Monday, 7 May 2007, 12:42 AM
  Well,

Most of the material was written over the years while working as quant instructor. I have a habit of writing something or the other all the time. Before TG, it used to be mostly short stories or articles on life (I'm a quant instructor who's heavily into literature). After TG, they are mostly quant or verbal. smile

Good that you still have time to read. I don't sad In 2001, I used to get Rs10000 every month in my first job, and from that I used to spent more than Rs2000 on books. And I used to finish reading them too. Those days are gone now. sad Last novel I finished reading was "All about H. Hatter" and this was a month back. Exceptionally good book though. You'd love the language. smile

After all the exams you have taken I'm surprised you are still left with quant doubts. But do bring them on. smile


Total Gadha
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by priyank daga - Wednesday, 23 May 2007, 08:41 AM
  the article was very interesting...as sentence re arrangement is an integral part of cat, it would be good if you update this article regularly.
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Kumar M - Tuesday, 10 July 2007, 07:31 PM
 

Hi TG,

I have a doubt in the answer you have explained for the question under the section PERSONAL PRONOUNS.

the relation FB will be best suited since both speaks about the  disturbance caused by relatives and friends to a workers(people).Please justify the relationship DB...

 

Thanks & Regards,

Muthukumar.C

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Ashwini Malavalli - Tuesday, 10 July 2007, 08:33 PM
 

hi TG

U r simply superb....

Thanks

Ashwini

 

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by chhavi mathuria - Monday, 13 August 2007, 08:54 AM
  hey thanx a bunch tg. plz plz also add some parajumbl exercises or quiz as there r fr quant, di n sentence correctn etc. it wud b of gr8 help. thnx agggain!big grin
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by jagan deep singh - Wednesday, 15 August 2007, 10:23 PM
  hi TG
i have  doubt in the example explained in PERSONAL PRONOUN. could u explain why DB is better option than FB?.  According to me FB is correct since both speaks about the  disturbance caused by relatives and friends and also the logical flow should suggest  FB is better choice than DB. Could u eloborate why  DB is  correct?.
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by ashok goel - Friday, 31 August 2007, 03:55 AM
  amazing
i never realised that
Hello TG
by Anshuman Bhar - Monday, 28 January 2008, 11:19 AM
  Hi,
First of all let me tell you onething that this website really rocks.I have recently joined this forum and found it amazingly good.Carry on the gud work.But I have few queries regarding the whole of english section. Let me frst give a small intro of myself.I have done my b.tech frm ISM dhnbd.Since my college times,I wanted to crack CAT.But I couldn't.Now that I am out of my college and I wanna go for CAT again this year but I am not finding where exactly I am going wrong. I practice a lot  but I can't make out why the particular option is correct.Even in CAT if you see, caoching institutes are not sure of which option is correct in verbal section.Actually there is so much ambiguity in CAT verbal.Can you please recommend how shall I approach the problems in CAT? I am really confsued. A little help from ur side will be appreciable.

Regards,
Anshaar
Re: Hello TG
by Ayush Saxena - Thursday, 15 May 2008, 12:54 PM
 

Hi TG,

I am trying hard to get a knack of "Jumbled Paragraphs", I try hard to identify the links but, so far I hav'nt been able to succeed. I think it will take a lots of practice to perfect the same. Can you put up some of amazing compilations on "Jumbled Paragraphs" (1000 JC's) up for grabs. Probably you can also put up some more notes on "Jumbled Paragraphs". But TG I will have to complement you on one thing. Your way of doing RC has been very successful with me.

Thank you so much for that wonderful analysis..

Thanks and Regards

Ayush.

Re: Hello TG
by chirag agarwal - Sunday, 18 May 2008, 01:21 AM
 

HI TG,

 

ur article was v good...

but how can I practice this...could you pls give us a compilation like 1000jc's..

would be very helpful...

thanx in advance...

chigis

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by ramesh singh - Tuesday, 20 May 2008, 11:54 PM
 

HI,

Can u sent more logic to establish the links between sentences

your jumbled paragrephes are very good


Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Aashish Dua - Saturday, 9 August 2008, 03:29 PM
 

Hie TG Sir

Thanks [again smile] for a nice article, it helped me in getting a better control over parajumbles.

Thanks again Sir.

Regards

 

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Aditya Zutshi - Monday, 11 August 2008, 03:45 PM
 

In the last question, can't DB be together?

D.   However binding the obligation to kill, members of feuding families engaged in mutual massacre will be genuinely appalled if by some mischance a bystander or outsider is killed.

B.    So the actual risk to outsiders, though no doubt higher than our societies, is calculable.

Thanks smile

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Anil Kumar - Saturday, 27 September 2008, 11:34 PM
  Excellent Article Indeed.. Thanks a lot TG.. U rock..
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Ankita Chowdhury - Wednesday, 8 April 2009, 11:12 AM
 

Hi TG Sir, Dagny Mam,

As you have posted 1000DS, 1000CR...do you have anything like 1000JP....it will be of gr8 help if you could post that as well....

Re: hello TG
by SUPER gadhi.. :P - Thursday, 7 May 2009, 09:07 PM
  Hello sir,
Nice article. It seems I'll atleast get my parajumbles right now smile.. thanks a lot for the post
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Virat Jhala - Monday, 25 May 2009, 03:28 PM
 

Hi TG,

 

This is for the very first time that i have been writing anything through this TG platform. apparantly, content given on TG is very useful for MBA aspirant.

 

i have been waiting for 1000 parajumbles file. kindly post it  so that we can make solving of parajumbles a daily routine..

Thanks...

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by iim freak - Thursday, 28 May 2009, 10:41 PM
  hi Dagny/TG ,, that was an article which has boost the confidence in me 2 make VA my forte... all i need is a lot of CAT level Qs on Parajumbles  so that i can master the tricks u tot above .. can u pls guide me in this regards.. thanks a lot
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by abdullah none - Friday, 16 October 2009, 10:40 AM
  dear sir,
these parajumbles are driving me nuts.

some para jumbles are simple narrations like qualities of some persons. they are descriptive with no obvious link between sentences. how do you go about them. do you just skip them in exam as there may be more than one possible answers. this one is taken from Arm Sharma's book. pl help me on this.

a) a wife may not be sure what her husband is saying means the end.

b) she has found that some people's voices often get higher or shriller when they lie, and they are more likely to stumble over words.

c) according to De Paulo, chnages in voice cab be significant.

d) she should listen carefully, not only to what he says, how he says it.


1) ADCB 2) ACDB 3) ADBC 4) ABCD
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Vipul Gupta - Saturday, 17 October 2009, 05:21 PM
  Is the ans 1
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Pankaj Kumar - Thursday, 29 October 2009, 01:24 AM
  Hi TG,

being a almost regular feature give some tips for fact,inference and judgement section- science of FIJ smile, please post sth as a almost proof method for FIJ. sooner the better as just 1 month for CAT.

Many Thanks for such a intelligent piece for parajumble smile
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Pankaj Kumar - Thursday, 29 October 2009, 08:53 AM
  Thanks TG, I just saw you already posted an article on FIJ.
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by amit singh - Thursday, 29 October 2009, 03:25 PM
 

Undoubtedly, good article.....absolutely agree with the approach. It requires SHEER LOGIC.

- Didn't do well on PJs on last few mocks, will use this approach. seems working.

Thanks

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by amit singh - Thursday, 29 October 2009, 03:30 PM
 

a) a wife may not be sure what her husband is saying means the end.

b) she has found that some people's voices often get higher or shriller when they lie, and they are more likely to stumble over words.

c) according to De Paulo, chnages in voice cab be significant.

d) she should listen carefully, not only to what he says, how he says it.


1) ADCB 2) ACDB 3) ADBC 4) ABCD

Answer:

Approach i took, LOGIC....since, statement has to be started using A, so C should come anywhere in between as it will create pronoun referrent confusion....so C has to be in the end. so option should be 3)ADBC

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Sourabh Goel - Saturday, 31 October 2009, 06:22 PM
  Hi All,

The answer is 1 (no logic) but some gut feeling.
There are two she's in the above Para jumble. One she relates to the wife and the other she relates to De Paulo. Ideally the above should start with C but since all options are starting from A therefore we are not left with much choice. B should succeed C as it bolsters what is said in B. And A should precede D. Look at 'not only to what he says, how he says' in D. A talks about husband has said something. Wife might have listened to what he said but might have ignored how he said that. It's very general in day to day life on what we say and how we say ( note the order). So the correct answer is 1..
Post your suggestions.

Sourabh
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Apoorv Kalra - Sunday, 1 November 2009, 12:19 PM
  Yes I too agree answer is 1. The link DB is not possible as D explains why wife should listen to her husband's voice carefully to analyse whether it is end or not. Whereas B refers to listen carefully to a person to judge whether he is lying or not.

Hi TG sir,

A great article I must say! I had a doubt in last question which you solved using logic. I was confused as to how the first sentence can have "However". It is a transition word and must have a sentence contradicting it in previous sentence. Can you please help me on this? Thanks for your guidance.
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by sammy badyal - Sunday, 15 November 2009, 04:27 PM
 

answer is 1 it makes sense coherently!!

 

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by abhishek rai - Monday, 10 May 2010, 01:27 PM
  Maybe the first one for the CAT 2011 to post....great one.!!!
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Akash Mehrotra - Saturday, 13 November 2010, 02:07 AM
  Sir,

It was really awesum.You given me a nice approach to solve parajumbles :D

Hope so I will gonna utilize it as much i can with perfection
Climb First provided unique study material
by Neelima Joshi - Wednesday, 13 July 2011, 07:36 AM
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Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Dignified Madness - Friday, 23 March 2012, 01:02 AM
  I remember taking a print out of this article from my office printer and then reading it and re-reading it several times! Legendary stuff! Cheers TG!!!
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Rajesh Dhandapani - Saturday, 26 May 2012, 09:24 PM
  Nice article !
Looking forward for more such articles from TG smile
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by VIPUL JAVERI - Saturday, 27 October 2012, 11:37 AM
  Is the answer 3) ADBC
since subject matter of option c differs from rest of the answer choice in my opinion option c can be considered as a dangler which can as the opening line or the closing line only.
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by deeksha sharma - Sunday, 11 November 2012, 08:12 PM
  THANKS A LOT SIR.......

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by ankita dasgupta - Friday, 1 March 2013, 10:02 AM
 

HI

I would like to point out a mistake in the last example- the one given under combine it all-The answer should be option b) ACDB

1. this is the logical flow of sentences.

2. in option 1, D starts with however-how can the para start with however

Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by Lokesh Sharma - Saturday, 2 March 2013, 03:56 PM
  Ankita

However is used in another way which has perhaps been unfamiliar to you. The meaning that you are acclimiatised with is where 'however' means 'but' or 'nevertheless'. Eg.1- However, they did not win. Eg. 2- We have not yet won; however, we shall keep trying.
However, 'however' could also mean- 'no matter how' or 'to whatever extent or degree'. For eg. 1 - However they tried to do it, they could not. Eg. 2- However much you spend, I will reimburse you.

Go through the question again to see that the 'however' used in D stands for the second meaning explained above.
Re: Jumbled Paragraphs (Parajumbles)- A Primer
by pawan kumar - Friday, 24 May 2013, 03:02 PM
  thanx...........lot